5. Dwayne Leverock – The first name that circumscribes in everyone’s mind is that of the gigantic Bermudian cricketer who enlivened the 2007 World Cup with a diving slip catch against India that probably registered on the Richter scale (it would be nice if it is taken on a lighter note of pun). What he is also known of is his canny slow left-arm deliveries. And when asked to explain his bulk – which is variously estimated at between some 120-133kg – Leverock admitted that he lived above an Indian restaurant, which can presumably be well understood.

 

4. John Jameson – English county star and Warwickshire opener John Jameson liked his foods much so that his perennial nickname of “Tubs” became so very appropriate. And, it did not stop him being a heavy scorer in county cricket and winning four prestigious caps for England, after India had sounded him out about playing for them (as he was born somewhere near the outskirts of Bombay, present day, Mumbai). Three fourth of his first four Test innings (against India in 1971) ended in run-outs, although that did not really have anything to do with his bulk. In Jamaica in 1973-74, Jameson got off the mark with a six.

 

3. Colin Milburn – Probably, the best-loved of all the rotund cricketers, English County Cricket’s and Northamptonshire’s most priced asset “Ollie”(his nickname) Milburn thwacked his way into the England side in 1966, but played only nine Tests before his career was effectively ended when he lost an eye in a car accident. His last Test innings though disclosed an aggressive nature as he hit a smashing score of 139 runs in Pakistan, which followed an amazing display for Western Australia when his 243 runs chase down against Queensland at the Gabba included 181 between lunch and tea. Although he often weighed in around 18 stone and called his life story ‘Largely Cricket’, Milburn was surprisingly quick between the wickets and was n flexible short leg.

 

2. Warwick Armstrong – Popularly known as the “Big Ship” among his teammates due to his colossal physical size, the larger than life mindset man, Armstrong garnered dual reputations as a brilliantly enigmatic all-rounder and a player who flagged officialdom throughout his career. After making his debut for Victoria in 1898-99, the name that he made for himself on the field of play was as a frightful right-hand batsman, quick and agile leg-spin bowler, and ultimately one of Australia‘s finest ever captains. The “Big Ship” was estimated to weigh around 133kg when he captained Australia after the First World War(in 1914) – but it didn’t seem to affect him much, as he won his first eight Tests in charge, interestingly all against England, including the first Ashes whitewash, in 1920-21. Armstrong was, if it is pardoned to say so, a true all-rounder (no pun intended) as he scored a triple-century in first-class cricket and six hundreds in Tests, and took 87 Test wickets with his canny legbreaks alongside.

 

1. Jesse Ryder – After the break-up between his parents, Jesse Ryder spent all those formative years of his without any sort of boundaries or directions and as a part of life, which also formed the basis of the alcohol trouble that has been a companion almost throughout his adult life. His recent media scams and fights and accidents all evolve out of his despair and solitude. The fellow New Zealander Ryder has had a much-publicised battle with the bottle, as well as his weight, in recent years. When he’s good, as in his Test double-century against India early in 2009, he’s very very good – but when he’s bad, he’s pretty bad, as in 2008 when he put his hand through a window after a late-night drinking session celebrating a one-day victory over England. Though such erratic form related problems does not have much to do with his overweight, still, it can be controlled.