David Warner continues his dissociation with alcohol

David Warner, the opening batsman of Australia, said he would continue his alcohol-free life until a situation warrants him a celebratory beverage. Warner said it has been ‘bizarre’ not to have alcohol since the last three months.

Warner gave up having alcohol prior to tour to the West Indies earlier this year, and he is not passed the self-imposed goal of 100 days drink-free. But he says his body is pleased with his effort, so he will keep going.

“It’s been 100 days now so it’s quite bizarre. I did think I had it in me to do it, but it’s about the discipline’. Warner said on the Cricket Australia website.

“I said from the start before I went to the West Indies that I wanted to give myself the best opportunity to get through the West Indies, the Ashes, a home series, to give myself the best opportunity because we have a lot of cricket to play and I’ve got to keep my body fresh and by doing that and by all means.

“You can celebrate and drink but at the moment I don’t feel we’ve had anything to celebrate.

“We’ve won a couple of Test matches and you’ve got to enjoy your wins because they’re very rare to come by. Had we won the (Ashes) series I probably would have had a drink.

“For me it’s about a personal choice and I’m feeling for my body for the longevity of my career so I’ve got try and put myself and the team first.

“For me to have a good career and a long career I’ve got to sacrifice little things to help the team and my part is to not drink at the moment.

“By all means I’m not going to stop drinking forever. If I feel there’s a need to have a drink I will.”

He justified his decision further, citing his wife’s similar attitude, as well as teammate Peter Siddle’s even longer on the matter: “Look at someone like Peter Siddle, hasn’t had drink in three years.

“It’s just a thing you can do after cricket as well.

“It’s part of our culture, not saying I gave up drinking because I couldn’t control myself or anything like that. It’s just the thing that’s been ingrained in myself over the last four-six months.

“I look at my wife (ironwoman Candice) for an example, the 15 years she dedicated to her sport and she probably would have drunk three or four times in her career.

“It’s those little discipline things that can keep you from playing one year to five years, but that’s just my choice, that’s my opinion and at the moment I’m not going to stop drinking. (I) just feel like at the moment I don’t need anything.”

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