There has been a complete wave of optimism within the Indian cricketing circles as Rahul Dravid was recently appointed as the coach of India A and the India U 19 side. The Indian batting legend gleefully accepted the BCCI’s proposal and was pleased to serve Indian cricket in any opportunity he got. Several renowned names in the cricketing circles were elated that Dravid accepted the opportunity. This is bound to be a brilliant move as the youngsters will be guided by Dravid himself, who is an inspiration for millions across the globe.

Speaking about his new role, Dravid sounded positive and said, “The selectors and the senior team management generally have a vision as to what sort of players they are looking to pick,” Dravid said on the sidelines of the convocation ceremony of the International Institute of Sports Management in Mumbai on Wednesday. “Sometimes you pick young players in India A, sometimes you pick players who are looking to make a comeback and want to push for the national team. Sometimes you pick players depending on what future tours are in mind.”

“So I think there are various parameters and you just can’t decide these kind of players should be selected or that kind. I see my job as coaching the players they have selected and not in the selection side of things. My job is to coach the players and try to help them to get to the next level,” said Dravid.

The batting icon also said that mentoring the Rajasthan Royals has provided him with a valuable experience. “The fact that I have spent a couple of years at Rajasthan Royals in the role of a mentor, I have seen the other side of what the sport is. I have always seen it as a player and I have spent many years as a player,” Dravid said.

“The couple of years that I spent outside in the management and the coaching side of things, there is a lot of learning that you get all the time, and the more you do it, the better you get. It is like playing. I am looking forward to it,” said Dravid.

The 42 year old said that there was no need to spoon feed and “teach” the senior national players with the basic knowledge. “There is no need for basic coaching at that (international) level. You are looking for someone as the guiding factor or someone to create a good environment which helps to grow and share some of the experiences that we have,” Dravid said. “My philosophy is not going to be teaching. I don’t think you need to teach India A players how to play. They all know how to bat and bowl and they are there because they are successful. It is just about trying to help them to get to the next level,” concluded Dravid. 

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