In his playing days, he was a complete match winner for the Australians. A test bowling average of just 23.52 is enough to signify how big an asset he was for the Kangaroos. However, the fact that Ryan Harris could just represent his nation in 23 tests is among the biggest tragedies of the modern era. Just when Harris was all set to make a comeback in mid-2015 against England in the Ashes, an injury ruled him out, thus ending his career.

 

However, the veteran pacer is back with a different role for the Kangaroos. Harris, who was recently named as Australia’s bowling coach for the upcoming tour of South Africa, is pretty geared up about his task. The former pacer will have the responsibility of mentoring a bowling attack that will be led by Victorian pacer John Hastings.

 

“I’ve got no problem with talking to the guys on a serious note,” Harris said. “I know the guys pretty well and I’ve got no problem working with guys that I’ve played with and have a relationship with.”Giving them a rev up doesn’t mean standing in front of them and telling them how badly they’ve played every day. It can be just quietly talking to them and finding out what their thoughts were in that particular time and working out how to get them better. “I’ve got no problem with doing that. I’ve got a good relationship with all of the guys in the team,” Harris added.

 

Harris added that he still missed playing as a member of the XI. “I still get a funny feeling in my stomach when I see the boys run out and they’re playing,” he said. “Especially when the results went the way they did in Sri Lanka, I was really hurt and felt for the boys.”I do miss being part of the group and hanging out and helping each other through times like that. “One thing I don’t miss is training every day. I was going through a fair bit of pain towards the end with my body and my knee so I don’t miss that. “But the playing part, I do really miss that.”

 

Harris added that he could learn a thing or two about coaching from Darren Lehmann. “Even in the last few years if we had bad days or went away from the plan, Michael Clarke or Darren or even Craig McDermott would come up and, not give you a yelling warning, just to sit down and give you a stern talking to just to remind you what you’re out there for and what the plans are. “That’s all a part of growing up as a player and that’s something I’ve got to learn as a coach,” Harris concluded.

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    A cricket enthusiast who has the passion to write for the sport. An ardent fan of the Indian Cricket Team. Strongly believe in following your passion and living in the present.

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