Sachin Tendulkar, considered one of the untouched cricketing greats, guaranteed to be a vocal supporter of sport when he was confirmed as a part of the Upper House of Parliament in June 2012.

As a cricketer, he delighted in the status of a divine being in India. However months in the wake of hanging up his boots, Sachin Tendulkar has come in for uncommon feedback for neglecting to go to a solitary session of Parliament not long from now.

The 41-year-old, considered one of the record-breaking cricketing greats, guaranteed to be a vocal supporter of game when he was confirmed as a part of the Upper House of Parliament in June 2012.

At the same time parliamentary records demonstrate the previous batsman has not went to a solitary session in the not so distant future. He made it to only three in 2013 and has so far not taken an interest in any open deliberations in the house.

In spite of the fact that Indian officials are known for neglecting to appear, Tendulkar has the most noticeably awful record of all, with only three percent participation a year ago, as per the checking gathering PRS Legislative Research.

The batsman was required to be even more a vicinity not long from now in the wake of resigning from cricket last November, and a few MPs wandered hidden feedback of him on Wednesday – albeit none set out to specify him by name.

“These MPs were chosen with the goal that they could be available and have any kind of effect in the general public. Anyhow I have never seen him in the house,” Samajwadi Party MP Naresh Agarwal told Parliament on Wednesday, in an obvious reference to Tendulkar.

DP Tripathi, a MP of the Nationalist Congress Party, said individuals who are not genuine about going to Parliament ought not to be named to the house.

“Their execution in the house has been detestable without a doubt. This is an affront to the Indian Parliament and such individuals ought not to be named to this house,” he said.

Tendulkar, the most astounding run-getter in both types of the game, resigned in the wake of playing in 200 Tests and scoring 15,921 runs.

He was offered one of the 12 seats in the Upper House that are reserved for the individuals who have separated themselves in different fields, for example, arts, sciences or social services.