Stats: Most 300 plus ODI scores in a calender year - Sportzwiki
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Stats: Most 300 plus ODI scores in a calender year

Stats: Most times 300 plus in ODIs in a calender year

With the innovation thanks to T20 cricket has changed the way players approach the game a lot. ODI Cricket is no more a game where batsman can score runs playing more deliveries. In 2003, 250 was a safe total and 300 were considered as formidable total, if any team could chase down that target that would have been the shocking news, like  India did  in 2002 chased down England’s 325 at Lord’s . But, in the last fifteen years it is observed that only 300 is more of a par total, asteams with hard hitting batsmen are chasing the target more often than not. So, teams have started to set a trend to score 300 plus target, in fact trends show gradual move towards a 400 runs. Even, South Africa made possible the impossible by chasing down Australia’s 434 in 2006. May be, that will be the trend in near future. 

Let’s check the maximum number of 300 plus score in the last decade year wise:

Year

No. 300

2007

51

2008

27

2009

43

2011

32

2013

35

2014

31

2015

45*

*stats are updated till 18th, June 2015

However, the change in approach has lot to do with the current ICC rules, which were implemented in October 30, 2012, have favoured the batsmen. Restriction of four fielders outside the 30 yard circle during the non power play overs, along with shorter boundary and no restriction on the size of the bat have added misery to the life of bowlers across the teams.

To soothe the misery of bowlers ICC recently discussed the possibility of removing the batting Powerplay and allowing five fielders outside the circle between overs 41 and 50. These suggestions were made by the ICC’s cricket committee that met in Mumbai last month. The committee also suggested a free-hit for all no balls in ODI and T20s, and not just for the front-foot calls.

As per the cricket committee’s suggestion the changes as it felt that fielding teams were at times left with limited defensive options. The alterations, if ratified, would mean there would be two fielders outside the circle for the first 10 overs, four for the next 30 and five for the last 10 overs.

On the topic of the balance between bat and ball, the committee discussed the size of bats, the boundaries and the durability of white ball and concluded that although the ICC will not introduce any regulations on the bat size, it will provide inputs for the consultation process ahead of MCC’s redrafting of laws in 2017.

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