The third Test between India and West Indies was looking all set to end in draw after the rain washed out the third day’s play and then West Indies batsmen performing well with the bat but then a brilliant display of swing bowling from comeback man Bhuvneshwar Kumar took the visitors to a good position in the match. Kumar took  five for 33 off 23.4 as the hosts were dismissed for only 225. Interacting with the media after the day’s play, the 26-year old spoke on his bowling , the match, pitch and much more.

Excerpts:

On bowling outswingers differently to Samuels and Blackwood:

There was not a particular reason but it was something I was trying in the nets. Because it makes some kind of angle that makes it difficult for the batsmen to play so that was the thing I was practicing in the nets. When I bowling to both of them, I was trying to bowl close to the stumps. There wasn’t a particular plan for Samuels but for both I was trying that thing.

On change in the momentum:

Biggest point was that the ball was swinging because when that happens it is a boost for me because I have more chances to take wickets. Especially after lunch I could do that so you can say that break was something positive for me because I got a break and I had to bowl after that. So when you get one wicket you get the confidence that you can bowl further and when I was bowling it was the same in my mind that these are the 7-8 overs in which I can take wickets. I didn’t think I would take five wickets but that comes with the momentum.

On the pitch and will it assist him on the final day:

It is very difficult to say that tomorrow I will get swing again because if you see earlier in the first innings I didn’t get as much swing, maybe the wicket was a bit damp. Today I got a lot of swing, maybe the ball was a good one. It is tough to say, so it is tough to predict for tomorrow, but there is something in the pitch for the bowlers so I think we can get them out again.

On his calm nature unlike other pacers:

It has been my nature from beforehand itself. I don’t get angry when someone drops a catch or (when) batsmen say something. From the beginning itself it wasn’t something I prepared for but this is something natural in me. You can say that my whole focus is to get the process right so I don’t get distracted with these things.

On his comeback after a long gap:

I played after almost one and a half years. I didn’t do anything specific for that, but when we had the camp in Bangalore so that’s the time when I started preparing for this series in particular. So I didn’t do anything different. I just knew that it will swing a bit here and there will be something in it for the fast bowlers. I prepared in that way only. For Test matches you need fitness so that’s the thing I was working most.

On the team’s plans:

We had a talk about that thing that if we can get them out before Tea, we will have enough time to get them out twice. We discussed our plans and we knew what we had to do but for that we needed to take wickets. After Lunch, when I got the first wicket I knew that this is the time if we can get one or two wickets, we can get them out. So, yes, we made our mindset that we had to get them out quickly if we had to win the Test match.

On fitness, consistency:

When I found out that I was playing I was a bit nervous. There was no pressure as such but if you are playing after so long there are some nerves, whatever format you play. For me, if I play in club cricket still I have some nerves. But when I came to the ground and bowled the first ball, everything felt normal. Maybe because I was thinking only about the process and focusing on that came from practice. I practice the way I am bowling in the match but it is not easy to sit outside for so long and then come back. It is not frustrating always, but it isn’t easy either. So it is important that you keep preparing yourself for the chance that might come. It is not necessary that you might get wickets, but it shouldn’t be that you are not prepared.