Test is the game of patience and one having that is able to make an impact in the game with a huge score. World has seen many batsmen who have provided us with great knocks and has made an impact. But sometimes batsmen take the Test game to a whole new level and play it like it is a T20 or an ODI match. Here we list the top 5 batsmen who delivered a knocking punch to the Test game and made it easy.

5. David Warner (Australia) – 69 Balls

A quick-scoring left-handed opening batsman, Warner is the first Australian cricketer in 132 years to be selected for a national team in any format without experience in first-class cricket. A diminutive and dangerous opening batsman, David Warner exploded onto the international scene in 2008-09. His breathtaking effort of 89 from 43 balls in his Twenty20 debut against South Africa at the MCG was all the more remarkable as he was the first man to walk out for Australia before playing first-class cricket since 1877. His great innings was played at Western Australia Cricket Association Ground, Perth from 13-15 January 2012. He scored 180 runs off 159 balls and hit 20 fours and 5 sixes at a strike-rate of 113.20. Australia won by an innings and 37 runs.

4. Shivnarine Chanderpaul (West Indies) – 69 Balls

A left-handed batsman, Chanderpaul is well known for his unorthodox batting stance, which has been described as crab-like. The possessor of the crabbiest technique in world cricket, Shivnarine Chanderpaul proves there is life beyond the coaching handbook. He never seems to play in the V, or off the front foot, but uses soft hands, canny deflections, and a whiplash pull-shot to maintain a Test average of around 50. While the cricket world was obsessed with Brian Lara‘s unquestionable talent, Chanderpaul has shown that there are alternate ways to be consistent and prolific in Test cricket over a long period of time, becoming only the second West Indian to score 10,000 Test runs. His fastest hundred came at Bourda, Georgetown, Guyana from 10-13 April 2003 against Australia.

3. Jack Gregory (Australia) – 67 Balls

Jack Morrison Gregory, of a famous Australian cricket family, had a comparatively brief Test match career, for although he played in twenty-four representative games, his skill and his power were as unpredictable as a thunderstorm or a nuclear explosion. He was known mainly as a fearsome right-arm fast bowler but, also, in Test matches he scored 1146 runs, averaging 36.96 with two centuries. He batted left-handed and gloveless. He also batted without a box. His best bowling was 7/69 in an innings and 8/101 in a match at the 1920/21 Test against England at the MCG. At Johannesburg in 1921 Gregory scored a century in seventy minutes v South Africa – the fastest hundred in the history of Test cricket. The match ended in a draw.

2. Adam Gilchrist (Australia) – 57 Balls

Adam Gilchrist was the symbolic heart of Australia’s steamrolling agenda and the most exhilarating cricketer of the modern age. He was simultaneously a cheerful throwback to more innocent times, a flap-eared country boy who walked when given not out in a World Cup semi-final, and swatted his second ball for six while sitting on a Test pair. He is an attacking left-handed batsman and record-breaking wicket-keeper, who redefined the role for the Australian national team through his aggressive batting. He is considered to be one of the greatest wicket-keeper–batsmen in the history of the game. He holds the world record for the most dismissals by a wicket-keeper in One Day International (ODI) cricket and the most by an Australian in Test cricket. His century against England at Perth in December 2006 is the second-fastest century in all Test cricket and he achieved that in 57 balls. The Test match was played at Western Australia Cricket Association Ground, Perth from 14-18 December 2006. His marvelous batting came from 2nd Innings where he scored 102 runs from 59 balls hitting 12 fours and 4 sixes at a strike-rate of 172.88. Australia won the Match by 206 runs.

1. Sir Viv Richards (West Indies) – 56 Balls

Sir Isaac Vivian Alexander Richards, popularly known as Viv (or King Viv), he is regarded as one of the greatest batsmen of all time and as one of the very finest players in the history of the sport.He is the man who gave “swagger” new meaning in cricket, Richards was the most destructive batsman of his era, and while there are many with greater records, few could take on, intimidate, and rip to shreds bowling attacks like he did. Richards was voted one of the five Cricketers of the Century in 2000, by a 100-member panel of experts, along with Sir Donald Bradman, Sir Garfield Sobers, Sir Jack Hobbs and Shane Warne. He scored the fastest Test century of the world in the 5th Test Match of the Wisden Trophy. The match was played at Antigua Recreation Ground, St John’s, Antigua from 11-16 April 1986. His 100 came from the 2nd innings and he scored 110 runs from 58 balls. He hit 7 fours and 7 sixes and had a strike-rate of 189.65. West Indies won the Test match by 240 runs.