Update: Rain threat looms over India D/N Test
Cricket

Update: Rain threat looms over India D-N Test


  • Former Indian captain  and current Cricket Association of Bengal president Sourav Ganguly has left no stone unturned for the first ever day-night club match in India. The CAB Superfinal will he held at the Eden Gardens which will be the first ever pink ball match in India.

    But, with monsoon rain  to hit Kolkata today, the rain may play spoilsport. The Superfinal between Bhawanipore and Mohun Bagan will be a four-day match from 18-21 June.

    The Alipore metrological department head GC Debnath said in a regular weather bulletin on Friday, “Monsoon has advanced into North Bengal and Gangtok. We expect it to hit the city within next two-three days.”

    Sourav Ganguly planned this match at Eden Gardens in a bid to get the first ever Day-Night Test in India when New Zealand will visit India in October.  The Superfinal will be played under the floodlights with a pink Kookaburra ball.

    The Bhawanipore and Mohun Bagan match will be telecast live by BCCI’s official broadcaster Star Sports.

    However, rain gods may spoil halt the proceedings anytime during the game.

    The 18-21 June match will be telecast live by BCCI’s official broadcaster Star Sports as the Sourav Ganguly-led Cricket Association of Bengal (CAB) is leaving no stone unturned to make it a success, but the former India captain will pray that rain stays away and do not halt the proceedings.

    At the moment, the length and breadth of the ground are covered with a trampoline.

    The first ever day-night Test was played in Australia when the host and their neighbour New Zealand played the game. Australia emerged winner of the match as the umpire made an error when Nathan Lyon’s bat and shoulder was misjudged by the umpire. The partnership of Shaun Marsh and Lyon changed the course of the match. New Zealand from a commanding position lost the plot and finally went down against the host.

    The match was completed in three days as under the flood light batsmen were finding it difficult to judge the length of the ball. Even fielders were finding hard to catch the ball.

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