The upcoming India’s tour of England from 9th July to 19th August promises to be an excellent feast. The matches will be played at heritage grounds embracing cricket history. TSentiments are attached at these historice grounds, dressing rooms, stadiums.

Let’s discuss about those ground where the upcoming test matches will be held.

Trent Bridge, Nottingham: The first match will start on 9th July at Trent Bridge, Nottingham, England.  It was established in 1841. It is named after River Trent. This ground can hold near about 17000 spectators. It has two end named Pavilion End, Radcliffe Road End. The stadium is floodlight enabled since 2008. Trent Bridge has been lucky to some of the finest cricketers in the world; Gary Sobers, Clive Rose and Richard Hadlee have all graced the ground and left a permanent mark on its history. The first test was played between England vs. Australia in 1899.That match was drawn. Recently the last match is played between also England vs. Australia in 2014. Recently the Radcliffe Road and Fox Road stands, with their stylish architecture, have made Trent Bridge one of the best viewing grounds in the country. Crowd is very lovely and cheerful here.

Lord’s, London: Lords is known as ‘Mecca of cricket’ .Second test will be played here from 17th July to 21st July. It was established 2 hundred years back in 1814. It is named after Thomas Lord. The ground is privately owned by the Marylebone Cricket Club (membership 18,000), is the home to the ECB and, from 1909 to 2005, the ICC. The main grandstand was built in 1997 and replaced the architecturally unique structure designed by Sir Herbert Baker which was opened in time for the 1926 Ashes Test.

It can hold around 30,000 spectators in the gallery. Every ground has two ends that is Pavilion End, Nursery End. It has 7 stands that is i.Warner Stand ii.Grand Stand iii.Compton Stand iv.Media Centre v.Edrich Stand vi.Mound Stand vii.Tavern Stand viii. Allen Stand. The crowd is sophisticated compare to other grounds.

The Rose Bowl, Southampton: The Rose Bowl stadium also or formerly known as West End. The third match will be played in this ground from 27th July to 31st July. It was established in 2001. It can manage 6,500 (20,000 with temporary seating) spectators.  It is designed like an amphitheater, where the striking feature is a three-storied pavilion with canopied roof.  Two ends of this ground are Pavilion End, Northern End. This ground is floodlight equipped. The first and only test cricket is played in this ground on 16th June, 2011 between Sri lanka vs. England. The match was drawn.

Old Trafford, Manchester: Old Trafford, is also or formerly known as Emirates Old Trafford. Fourth match will start here from 7th August to 11th August. It was established in 1857. During the 1990s, Old Trafford became Lancashire’s fortress of one-day cricket and the main source of income at this stadium is the Old Trafford lodge. The ground witnessed a record attendance of over 22,000 for the epic clash between Pakistan and India in the 1999 ICC Cricket World Cup. Flood lights were installed in 2011. It’s capacity is 19000. Two ends of this ground is Stretford End, Brian Statham End. The first test match was played between England vs. Australia in 1884 and the last match also played between England vs. Australia in 2013. The crowd is very cheerful here.

The Oval, London: Another heritage name of ground is ’The Oval’. It is known to people of different generations, differently – The AMP Oval, The Foster’s Oval, The Brit Oval, The Kia Oval. This is the historic venue where the legend of the Ashes was born a couple of years after the inaugural Test, in August 1882. The fifth match will be held at this ground from 15th August to 19th August. This ground is situated in 1845. It also Supports Floodlight facility since 2009.

The first Test match was played between England vs Australia in 1880.England won that match. The last match was played between England vs. Australia. It’s capacity of holding spectators is around 23500. The crowd is lively here.