The chief doctor of the late Formula One champ Michael Schumacher, Dr Gary Hartstein has a real bad news for his buffs. The docs are going extra time to improve the status of the former F1 driver, only the Doctor has warned that the fans should get ready ‘for the worst’. Schumacher had met an accident while he was skiing in the Alps in December.

The head doctor has written in his blog, “The longer the process of revival takes; it becomes less and less probable that Michael will recover.”

“The longer one remains in a vegetative state, the less the likelihood of emerging, and the higher the chances of dangerous complications if the patient answers in fact emerge,” he penned.

“I spent years at circuits drenched in red by the Ferrari caps, flags, and shirts, and all of that for Michael. I’m still staggered by the depth and persistence of his fans’ love for him. And whereas I worried more than a scrap about what was going to pass off when and if really bad news got announced, I’ve realised that maybe the lack of status updates has given us all a chance to get on a bit, to process what’s happening, and to come down to… detach.” He added, gravely.

Schumacher had lost 20-25% of his body weight in the final few days. However, Hartstein said that the place is still under control, and on the double the situation is not that adverse.

“A patient in a coma doesn’t require his or her muscle, but the diaphragm. The diaphragm, which like the pump is pretty much always active, resists atrophy rather better than other muscles, simply it does atrophy. And giving a car doing the breathing for you is one of the best ways to see how disuse atrophy affects the diaphragm as well. Regrettably, and assuming (as I have until today) that Michael is being ventilated by a respirator, in that respect is probably more or less degree of diaphragmatic a trophy at this point.”

When he has been asked about the patience who has been in coma for a long time. He composed, “Patients who are in a persistent/permanent vegetative state have life spans that are measured in months to a few years. This depends on the baseline function (extraordinary in the case of Michael, of course), the quality of nursing care, and other imponderables. They usually die of respiratory or urinary infections. Longer survivals have been reported, but are exceptional.”

Michael Schumacher got hit his head on a rock while he was skiing with his 14-years-old son in the French resort of Meribel in December 2013. The agent of Schumacher, 45, Sabine Kehm and his family confirmed that he has made a recovery and there is still a ray of hope of his recovery soon.