Ethan Carter III spoke with Alex Obert of the Journey of a Frontman website at Tommy Dreamer’s House of Hardcore VIII event last weekend. Here are some highlights:

Working with top guys like Sting and Kurt Angle:

Looking at it from the perspective as a fan growing up watching wrestling, it’s surreal to be in the ring with guys I considered heroes, guys I watched every week. From being a little kid to a teenager, I would see a thing Kurt Angle did in a match one time and pause the TV. Then I’d look to my dad and say, “Someday I’m gonna do that.” And he’s like, “Okay.” Then someday I’m doing it and I’m in the ring with a guy that inspired me. As a fan, that’s incredible. As far as a talent or performer, you only get better being in the ring with people that are better than you.

The only way to improve is to be in situations you’re not accustomed to and being taught through hands-on training. Being in the ring with Sting, Bully, Angle, even all the other veterans in TNA like Eric Young, Austin Aries, Matt Hardy, Abyss, you’re always learning with all those guys. You always learn with everything you do. Guys that have been around longer have learned from some of the best too. It’s the trickle-down effect. Trickle-Down Economics, Ronald Reagan style.

Having freedom with his character:

I think being locked into a verbatim script is hard for a wrestler because we’re not professional actors. If we were, we’d be getting paid not to get hurt. The thing about being a wrestler and a character is that it’s an extension of your personality. It’s hard for somebody to write who you are. It’s easier to be given a scenario and a situation where you can act in it. You get a script in both places, there’s a difference in that sense.

In the sense of TNA, I’ve been able to take scripts and feel it out there. I’m not deviating from the important things, but I’ll put it in my own words. And I think that’s helped me greatly because I’m the best me that I can be and every talent is the best they can be. It’s also the talent’s responsibility to incorporate themselves into their character and not be apprehensive by saying that something sucks and they don’t want to do it. You have a segment on national television, take that as an opportunity to make it something special. Every time you have a chance, do something special.

The Bill DeMott controversy:

It’s an unfortunate situation that happened. There’s varied opinions. As far as wrestling training, it should be difficult a hundred percent. You’re in a place where you’re supposed to represent the best. During my time in developmental, I had some of the best coaches in the world. I had Dr. Tom Prichard, Steve Keirn, Norman Smiley, we had Billy Kidman for a time, Ricky Steamboat, and all these guys push you. They push you to be better constantly.

I would be dead dog tired from those practices, but it was never at the expense of my humility as a human being, at the expense of being made an example of, it was to get better. I was pushed to get better. I firmly believe that fully. As far as that scenario, what’s come out are things that did happen and it isn’t a place for that. Not in 2015. Not in wrestling in general. It’s not bettering you as a wrestler.

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