Ian Chappell raises question about Virat Kohli’s close in fielding skill

Sudipta / 24 July 2016
India

Former Australian captain Ian Chappell pointed out some technical mistakes in Indian Test captain Virat Kohli’s fielding skills.

Chappell in his Hindustan Times columns on England vs Pakistan series took a various instance of Virat Kohli’s fielding flaws but began with the Lord’s performance where the pitch was good for the bowlers and specifically for spinners.

The former cricketer also added that some of the catches are incredible due to the athleticism of the players, but he pointed that fielders lack the technique of close catching.

He also said it is not only about Virat Kohli also about all young fielders. Chappell also analysed behind the wicket catch drops, “Most of the dropped catches behind the wicket are the result of one simple technical flaw; the failure to slightly turn the foot outwards, to the side on which the ball is travelling before making the next move. Without this simple manoeuvre, the fielder will be off-balance when attempting to complete a catch.”

However, Chappell stated that the Indian Test captain is a very high-quality batsman with excellent hand-eye coordination which should make Kohli a natural for catching positions.  But he said Kohli’s failure at slip catching due to technical flaws.  To grab slip catches a  fielder needed to anticipate the leg slip position when  spinners are operating.

“I watched in amazement as Garry Sobers – fielding at leg-slip for South Australia – calculated that a Victorian batsman was purely blocking the last over before lunch. Choosing his moment perfectly, he stepped forward, placed his hand on the ground and the ball was played straight into his it,” Chappell wrote in his column in the Hindustan Times.

Chappell also hailed Gary Sobers and Eknath Solkar of India as  the best close infielder. He also said Solkar is not there to help Kohli to excel in his position, “Sobers was one of the best in that position but he had an equal in India’s Eknath Solkar. Solkar was exceedingly brave in the short-leg position and would’ve made an excellent pickpocket; he stood so close without you feeling his presence.”