Kochi Tuskers Kerala may comeback in the IPL fold: Reports

Sudipta / 24 July 2015

Kochi Tuskers, whose contract was allegedly terminated by BCCI in 2011 with an allegation that they don’t have world class stadium, may come back in the next Indian Premier League (IPL).

Kochi Tuskers filed a case in the Supreme Court of India after BCCI allegedly terminated their contract. The apex court set up a committee for arbitration judgment in which justice Lahoti gave a verdict in favour Kerala franchise; and asked BCCI to pay INR 900 crore to Kochi Tuskers.

Justice Lahoti had ruled that it was a fundamental breach on part of board. Justice Lahoti then asked BCCI why they did not heed to the request of Rendezvous Sports World, the owner of the Kochi Tuskers, to shift out of Kochi to another venue -Ahmedabad. The deadline for BCCI is September 22. In between they have to decide what they want. For BCCI two options are available. Either pay the cash as per the court verdict or allow Kochi Tuskers in the next IPL.

A report carried out by Times of India, said BCCI may choose the second option – allow Kochi Tuskers in the next IPL- which will prevent outflow of bulky cash. Now the question is will Kochi Tuskers accept the condition;If they agree to participate in the IPL, the quota for seventh will also be filled. Meanwhile, in the wake of Lodha Committee verdict after which image of BCCI severally damaged will restore some confidence among the concerned people.

BCCI is liable to pay 900 crore; and the figure “is higher than what almost five of the eight IPL franchises are supposed to pay BCCI in 10 years,” a BCCI officials told Times of India. “The BCCI is in deep trouble. The only way forward is to settle it out of court,” a senior board official said, while another added, “The BCC will challenge the decision because in the judgment the arbitrator has gone beyond the scope of the (franchise agreement).” BCCI’s former lawyer PR Raghuraman told TOI that BCCI has no choice but to pay up.

“If they decide to play, the worry over the possible inclusion of another team is taken care of. But more importantly, their coming back is the only way BCCI can stem the outflow of cash. The payments can be adjusted against their annual franchise fee. The amount is so big that even an out of court settlement sounds daunting,” PR Raghuraman stated.

Justice Lahoti led committee asked BCCI during the hearing of the arbitration that, when BCCI allowed their bid they did not know about the condition of the stadium? And if they were “ware” that the Jawaharlal Nehru is not cricket stadium then why the development work did not proceed further. “The respondent’s (BCCI) dogmatic insistence resulting in driving Kochi Cricket Pvt Ltd to a non-suitable and worn out JN Stadium (Jawaharlal Nehru), which was not a cricket stadium, not to talk of a world class stadium suitable for holding IPL matches, added to the gravity and fundamental of the breach,” Lahoti has ruled.

 

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