2003 World Cup | Sportzwiki

2003 World Cup

Virender Sehwag Reuters Photo
Virender Sehwag Reuters Photo
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Virender Sehwag: Sourav Ganguly Best Skipper For He Taught India To Win Tests Abroad

Virender Sehwag has weighed Sourav Ganguly over MS Dhoni in captaincy, saying the former taught India how to win abroad.

Indian cricket has been blessed with some of the finest captains there ever have been. From Kapil Dev to Virat Kohli, there have been a number of leaders who have contributed immensely towards the growth of the sport.

Virender Sehwag
Virender Sehwag (Image Credit: Twitter)

Virender Sehwag Feels Captaincy Wise Both MS Dhoni And Sourav Ganguly Were Great But The Best Was Sourav Ganguly For He Taught India To Win Tests Abroad

Virender Sehwag, who has played under some brilliant leaders, picked the better one between Sourav Ganguly and MS Dhoni. Both Sourav Ganguly and MS Dhoni made significant contributions to Indian cricket.

Sourav Ganguly (Source: File Photo)
Sourav Ganguly (Source: File Photo)

While Sourav Ganguly took the Indian team to the 2003 ICC World Cup final, MS Dhoni won three ICC titles during his days at the helm. Though there’s no denying that MS Dhoni tops the charts of all India captains when it comes to success at major tournaments, Virender Sehwag feels current BCCI President Sourav Ganguly was the better one of the two.

“I feel captaincy-wise, both of them were great. But I feel the best amongst the two was Ganguly because he built the team from the onset, took in new players, and rebuilt a unit. He taught India to win matches abroad, we drew Test matches, won some abroad under him,” the former India cricketer said on RJ Raunak’s YouTube show “13 Jawab Nahi”.

“Dhoni was lucky in the sense that he got the same team to lead that Ganguly had nurtured, so they both were great but better was Sourav Ganguly,” he added.

MS Dhoni announced his retirement from all forms of International Cricket on 15th December 2020. He retired as the only captain to win all major ICC trophies (2011 ODI World Cup, 2007 T20 World Cup, and 2013 Champions Trophy). MS Dhoni played his last game in the Indian colors in the semi-final of the ICC Cricket World Cup 2019.

Unfortunately, India lost the game to New Zealand and was eliminated from the competition. He had made his debut for Team India back in 2004. On the other hand, Sourav Ganguly’s Test debut came at Lord’s. The left-hander made the world sit up and take notice of his skills with a spectacular hundred on debut against England in 1996. 6 years later, Sourav Ganguly led India to a famous tri-series win in the Natwest series, this time as skipper.

Virender Sehwag Also Opened Up On Not Taking Single On Sri Lanka’s Tour In 2008 And Favourite Ground Being Mohali

Virender Sehwag is known to reach some of the major milestones in his career with a six. Often in the 90s, Virender Sehwag would hit a six to complete his century. However, once batting on 199, he refused to take a single. Shedding light on the matter during the conversation with RJ Raunak, Virender Sehwag revealed the reason behind his decision.

“This is a very old tale. We were on Sri Lanka’s tour in 2008. I remember Muttiah Muralitharan was bowling and I had Ishant Sharma at the non-striker’s end. I knew that if I take a single, Muralitharan would dismiss Ishant, so I decided to farm the strike and save Ishant. But Muralitharan placed all the fielders close by, and luckily the ball went in the gap and we took a single on the last ball. Ishant did not survive too long after that and was dismissed in the very next over.”

Virender Sehwag Image Credits: Twitter/@ICC
Virender Sehwag Image Credits: Twitter/@ICC

During the chat, the former opener also revealed his favorite ground to be Mohali in Chandigarh.

“I have always loved Mohali. I always enjoyed playing there. Whenever I used to step out at that venue, I felt I will score runs for sure. Also, there are huge sofas there, so even if you get dismissed, just go back and relax on those sofas. Outside India, I like Melbourne. The food there is great, and even at that venue I felt like I would be able to score many runs,” he revealed.

In a career spanning over 14 years, Virender Sehwag reinforced Team India’s top-order across formats. Following his first few years, he became the mainstay opener in all three formats alongside Gautam Gambhir. In 104 Tests, he racked up 8,586 runs at a terrific average of 49.34, including 23 tons. He also registered 8,273 ODI and 394 T20I runs in his career.

Virender Sehwag is one of the four cricketers (Don Bradman, Chris Gayle, and Brian Lara) in the world to have slammed two triple hundreds in Test cricket. Notably, he is the only Indian to do so. He recorded his first triple ton (309) against Pakistan in the famous Multan Test of 2004. Four years later, he registered his second (319) against South Africa in Chennai.

Cricket Coronavirus Lifestyle World News Education Home / Cricket / Former captain George Bailey replaces Hohns as Australia's chief selector George Bailey appointed chair of the National Selection Panel.(Getty Images) George Bailey appointed chair of the National Selection Panel.(Getty Images)
Cricket Coronavirus Lifestyle World News Education Home / Cricket / Former captain George Bailey replaces Hohns as Australia's chief selector George Bailey appointed chair of the National Selection Panel.(Getty Images) George Bailey appointed chair of the National Selection Panel.(Getty Images)
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George Bailey Appointed As Australia’s New Selection Chief

George Bailey, a former Australian batsman has been named the new chairman of selectors of the Australia men’s team following the retirement of Trevor Hohns. George Bailey, who played 125 times for Australia, joined the panel in 2019 and takes on the top job ahead of selecting squads for the T20 World Cup and the Ashes later this year.

Trevor Hohns steps down having served collectively on the selection panel for 21 years – 16 as chairman – across two periods from 1991 to 2005 and 2016 to 2021.

George Bailey joined the selection panel in 2019 Getty Images
George Bailey joined the selection panel in 2019 Getty Images

George Bailey Credited Trevor Hohns For Doing Well And Says He Has Been Calm Consistent And Approachable In His Challenging Job

George Bailey joined the panel in February last year and takes over as chief selector before this year’s Twenty20 World Cup, a home Ashes series against England as well as away tours to the sub-continent. George Bailey, who played 90 ODIs, 30 T20I, and 5 Tests for Australia and led the team in 57 fixtures (29 ODIs and 28 T20Is) in all, joined the selection panel last February as a replacement for Greg Chappell.

Trevor Hohns has reportedly quit his role as chief selector of the Australian men's cricket team.
Trevor Hohns has reportedly quit his role as chief selector of the Australian men’s cricket team. Source: AAP

“Firstly, I would like to thank Trevor for his incredible work which has helped shape the success of Australian cricket over a long period, including during my days as a player and captain,”George Bailey said.

“In what can be a challenging job Trevor has always been calm, consistent and approachable. Similarly to his journey, he has made my transition from player to selector as smooth as possible. There is a lot I will take from Trevor’s style and very much look forward to the journey ahead,”George Bailey said.

Trevor Hohns’ first period as chairman from 1995-2005 involved a period of huge success for the national team which included the 1999 and 2003 World Cup victories and the record run of 16 consecutive Test wins. He stepped down from his first stint after the 2005 Ashes defeat but returned in 2016 for a second stint.

The second spell included the dramatic fallout from the Newlands ball-tampering scandal which required the management of the post-ban returns of Steven Smith, David Warner, and Cameron Bancroft that happened during the 2019 Ashes were Australia retained the urn in England for the first time in 18 years.

“The game has been great to me and I have loved every minute of it, from the good times to the bad,” Hohns said. “I have been extremely fortunate to be involved with some of the greatest Australian teams of all time and many of the best players to have played the game.”

“The successes of the side over the years have been great but I remember my time just as much for the wonderful people you work with and those you meet along the way. It has been an amazing journey for me, but all things come to an end. I am happy with my decision.”

The 67-year-old, a former Australian spin bowler, became a selector in 1993 and under his first stint, Australia won a record 16 successive Test matches and claimed the 1999 and 2003 World Cups in a golden era.

Ben Oliver Paid Tribute To Trevor Hohn’s Unparalleled Impact On Australian Cricket

Ben Oliver, Cricket Australia’s head of national teams, paid tribute to Trevor Hohns‘ service to the game and the qualities of his successor.

“The impact Trevor has had on Australian cricket has been unparalleled over a long period of time,” he said. “For someone to have played such an integral part in so many incredible eras is a feat few, if any, ever achieve.”

“The role of national selector is one of the most scrutinised in Australian sport and Trevor has performed it with great strength, judgement and humility. We will miss his experience but respect his decision to take a step back from the game and are grateful for his stewardship.”

Ben Oliver appointed as Executive General Manager of National Teams at Cricket Australia
Ben Oliver was appointed as Executive General Manager of National Teams at Cricket Australia

“George is a highly respected leader who is now well established on the NSP alongside Justin as the head coach,” he added. “He has brought recent playing experience with a deep understanding of the game, an open and collaborative style and a desire to keep improving the selection function.”

Ben Oliver also confirmed a third member of the selection panel would be appointed in the coming months.

Chairman of selectors Trevor Hohns. Source: AAP
Chairman of selectors Trevor Hohns. Source: AAP
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Trevor Hohns Quits As Australia’s Chief Selector; George Bailey Likely To Replace Him

Trevor Hohns, Australia’s chief selector has reportedly quit his role ahead of the ICC T20 World Cup 2021. It is reported that Trevor Hohns has recently handed his notice. Former Australia batsman George Bailey is likely to replace him, according to the report.

Trevor Hohns had a combined 16 years as chief selector across two stints from 1995 to 2021. He was a selector in successful Australia’s World Cup campaigns of 1999 and 2003, apart from three successful Ashes defences and their series win in India in 2004.

Trevor Hohns has reportedly quit his role as chief selector of the Australian men's cricket team.
Trevor Hohns has reportedly quit his role as chief selector of the Australian men’s cricket team. Source: AAP

Trevor Hohns Had Two Stints As National Selector

The 67-year-old, a former Australian spin bowler, became a selector in 1993 and under his first stint, Australia won a record 16 successive Test matches and claimed the 1999 and 2003 World Cups in a golden era. His current stint as chief selector began in 2016 when Rod Marsh quit following a string of heavy test defeats. George Bailey is a current selector, but Cricket Australia is yet to confirm the report.

Trevor Hohns. (Credits: Web)
Trevor Hohns. (Credits: Web)

Trevor Hohns recently handed in his notice after the second of two stints as chair of selectors. His time in charge has added up to a combined 16 years, spanning 1995 to 2021 and featuring many of Australian cricket’s most dominant summers as he quietly managed successful transitions of several generations of international cricketers. It’s unclear when exactly Trevor Hohns will step aside with Australia set to play five T20Is against Bangladesh from Tuesday.

Trevor Hohns Tenure Saw Australia Lifting The 1999 And 2003 World Cups

As chair, Trevor Hohns’ honour board includes the 1999 and 2003 World Cups, rare series wins in Pakistan in 1998 and India in 2004, and successful Ashes defences in England in 1997, 2001, and 2019.

The Australian team celebrates on the Lord’s balcony after annihilating Pakistan in the 1999 final World Cup final © Getty Images
The Australian team celebrates on the Lord’s balcony after annihilating Pakistan in the 1999 final World Cup final © Getty Images.
On June 20, 1999, Pakistan abjectly surrendered to Australia in the final of the World Cup at the Lord’s. Shane Warne’s 4 for 29 against South Africa in the semi-final had almost single-handedly dragged Australia from the cusp of a World Cup exit to their second successive final.
On the last day of the tournament, Pakistan was decimated by Australia’s single-minded ruthlessness in a match that lasted just a ball over 59 overs. Shane Warne had claimed four wickets for the second game running, taking his tournament tally to 20, a shared World Cup record for the time, which was overtaken in subsequent editions. Shane Warne’s spin had reduced Pakistan to 133 and Adam Gilchrist then bludgeoned a 36-ball 54 to set Australia on the way to the first milestone of a famous World Cup treble.
In the 2003 World Cup, Australia missed Steve Waugh, Shane Warne, and Jason Gillespie only in spirit as they routed India by 125 runs. The mischievous smile rarely left Ricky Ponting’s boyish face as he led from the front, playing the innings of his life for an unbeaten 140 that powered Australia to 359/2 from 50 overs.
In the face of great pressure chasing 360, India was given fleeting glimpses of hope by Virender Sehwag (82) and the rain but succumbed to 234 all out in 39.2 overs.
File image of Suresh Raina.(AP)
File image of Suresh Raina.(AP)
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Suresh Raina Recalls Occasional Unrest Among Indian Players

Suresh Raina did not name the individuals in his autobiography Believe but explained that he would occasionally receive a cold shoulder from some players upon his arrival on the Indian team.

Former India batsman Suresh Raina has revealed that he did not have the smoothest of relations with some of the senior players of the Indian team initially in his career. Suresh Raina made his India debut in 2005 under the captaincy of Rahul Dravid and when Greg Chappell was the coach.

Suresh Raina has 5615 runs from 226 ODIs and 1605 from 78 T20Is for India. (Source: File)
Suresh Raina has 5615 runs from 226 ODIs and 1605 from 78 T20Is for India. (Source: File)

Suresh Raina Admits Having Tense Moments With Cricketers In India’s Dressing Room

Suresh Raina did not name the individuals but explained that he would occasionally receive a cold shoulder from some players upon his arrival on the Indian team.

(File) Sourav Ganguly (left) with Greg Chappell
(File) Sourav Ganguly (left) with Greg Chappell

“Believe me, I know what ragging is. We didn’t have that. What we did have were some tense moments with some players. There were instances when we would greet some of the senior players in the morning, and they wouldn’t greet us back. But I never took these to heart.”

The Greg Chappell era remains an infamous one in the history of Indian cricket. It was a time when Indian cricket was in a bit of turmoil with the whole Sourav Ganguly-Greg Chappell fallout, which was followed by India’s early elimination from the 2007 World Cup after which Greg Chappell was duly shown the door.

Suresh Raina: A Significant Change Was Rahul Dravid Replacing Sourav Ganguly As The Skipper Which Led To Discomfort And Unrest

With Sourav Ganguly out of the team, Rahul Dravid replaced him as the captain of the team, which Suresh Raina revealed was one of the reasons behind the tension between some senior players. The former left-handed batsmen informed that even though Sachin Tendulkar and skipper Rahul Dravid would try and maintain a positive environment in the team, there was occasional unrest.

After his ouster from the team in 2005, Sourav Ganguly was replaced by Rahul Dravid as India captain. (Getty Images)
After his ouster from the team in 2005, Sourav Ganguly was replaced by Rahul Dravid as India captain. (Getty Images)

“So, it was the accumulation of all these factors that led to the occasional unrest among the seniors. It was a transitional period for the team. Not every junior player felt comfortable in that situation. But my relations with Rahul Bhai were very good.”

Former Indian cricket captain and current BCCI President Sourav Ganguly always maintained that the “biggest setback” of his career was when he was stripped of his captaincy and eventually dropped from the national side in 2005. Many senior cricketers, including Sourav Ganguly, have talked about the period when India was coached by Australian Greg Chappell and his strained relationship with others in the team.

Sourav Ganguly, also fondly known as ‘Dada’, made his comeback in 2006 in India’s tour of South Africa and proved his critics wrong that his best years were gone by. He played some of his best knocks before hanging up his boots in 2008.   He is revered as one of the best Indian captains for his role in reviving Indian cricket’s image following the match-fixing scandal in 2000.

His brand of fearless and aggressive cricket made India into a force to reckon with in world cricket. Apart from the many milestones and victories that the team chalked up under his leadership, he also led India to the final of the 2003 World Cup. He represented India in 113 Tests and 311 ODIs, scoring 7,212 and 11,363 runs in the respective formats during his career.

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Monty Panesar Revealed Plans Shared With James Anderson To Dismiss Sachin Tendulkar

Monty Panesar, England spinner has explained how and veteran fast bowler James Anderson planned on dismissing the great former Indian batsman Sachin Tendulkar during India vs England Tests. Sachin Tendulkar was prolific against several bowlers of his time but was never at his free-flowing best against England spinner Monty Panesar and pacer James Anderson.

In fact, James Anderson has dismissed Sachin Tendulkar nine times in Tests while Monty Panesar got his wicket four times in 11 Tests.

James Anderson
James Anderson (AP Photo/Andy Brownbill)

Monty Panesar Felt End Or Start Of Interval After Lunch Or Tea Was The Best Time To Dismiss Sachin Tendulkar

The former left-arm spinner revealed that while getting Sachin Tendulkar was never easy, England sensed a particular pattern in his batting, and Monty Panesar and James Anderson explored it to dismiss the former India batsman several times.

“Every time there used to be an interval… the first five minutes or the end of the interval when Sachin looked like he wanted to close out. We thought that was the best time to get Sachin out. After lunch or tea, the first five minutes used to be crucial. It’s like a car that takes 5-7 minutes to warm up. Once it’s away, there is nothing stopping it. If you missed it, you had to wait for the next interval,” Monty Panesar told Sports Yaari in an interview.

Monty Panesar
Monty Panesar

In fact, Monty Panesar’s maiden Test wicket was that of Sachin Tendulkar during England’s 2006 tour of India.

Monty Panesar had Sachin Tendulkar out LBW on Day 3 of the Nagpur Test and went on to pick his wicket three more times. As a matter of fact, Monty Panesar’s delivery to dismiss Sachin Tendulkar during the 2012 home series is believed by many experts to be one of the best balls bowled ever in Test cricket. The ball looped, gripped, and turned, squaring up Sachin Tendulkar to hit his off-stump.

“This is how me dismissed Sachin so many times. Those 5-10 minutes… James Anderson knew this was the opportunity. The first five minutes after every interval, Sachin would take a little time, but once he was set, then he was difficult to get out,” Panesar added.

Sachin Tendulkar has played 200 Tests. His highest appearances in Tests is surely a record tough to break. Against England, he amassed 2535 runs in 32 Tests averaging 51.73 a little less than his career batting average of 53.79. In England, he amassed 1575 runs in 17 Tests averaging 54.31.

Sachin Tendulkar Has Many Records To His Name

In 200 Test matches, he has scored 15,921 runs in the process, with an amazing average of 53.78, including 51 Test hundreds and 68 fifties. He retired from the Test format after playing the last Test match against West Indies at his home ground Wankhede Stadium in 2013. His retirement from the game was an emotional moment for Indians.

Sachin Tendulkar carried on the shoulders of his teammates after the 2011 World Cup win | AFP
Sachin Tendulkar carried on the shoulders of his teammates after the 2011 World Cup win | AFP

Sachin Tendulkar has been part of six ICC World Cups but his best came in the 2003 world Cup where he scored the most runs. In 11 matches played in the mega event, he scored 674 runs which remains the most runs by a player in the single edition.

Even his prolific performance could not help India to lift up the trophy of ICC World Cup 2003. But he got the chance to lay his hands on the trophy in ICC World Cup 2011 where he was the second-highest scorer in the tournament. In ODIs, he has the most runs- 18426 and was the first player to score a double-ton. He has the most runs -34357 in his career. He has the most runs-2278 in World Cups averaging 56.95 with 6 tons in 45 matches.

Ricky Ponting, right, is set to be replaced as Australia captain by Michael Clarke. Photograph: Aijaz Rahi/AP
Ricky Ponting, right, is set to be replaced as Australia captain by Michael Clarke. Photograph: Aijaz Rahi/AP
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Michael Clarke Opens Up On How He Saved Predecessor Ricky Ponting From Getting Dropped

Michael Clarke, former Australia captain has revealed that he saved his predecessor two-time World Cup-winning skipper Ricky Ponting from getting dropped from the national side after taking over the reins of the national team.

It’s not common for Australian captains to continue playing after stepping down as they usually retire while still in charge. Allan Border, Mark Taylor, Steve Waugh, and even Michael Clarke himself, are some of the examples.

Delhi Capitals head coach Ricky Ponting (Photo | IPL Twitter)
Delhi Capitals head coach Ricky Ponting (Photo | IPL Twitter)

Michael Clarke Fought To Keep Ricky Ponting In Team When He Took Captaincy

However, it wasn’t the case with Ricky Ponting, one of the most successful captains in Test history. Ricky Ponting stepped down from the Australian captaincy after the 2011 World Cup, and expectably Michael Clarke took over. Ricky Ponting remained committed to the team’s cause and received backing from his long-time vice-captain, who believed in his experience and ability.

Ricky Ponting and Michael Clarke. (Getty )
Ricky Ponting and Michael Clarke. (Getty )

Speaking to former NRL star Brett Finch on his Uncensored podcast, Michael Clarke revealed that Australian selectors were keen to move on and drop Ricky Ponting to provide the new leader with a fresh environment.

“When I took over the captaincy, that’s why I fought to keep Ricky,” said Michael Clarke.

“The selectors said, ‘Very rarely does a captain stand down and stay in the team, so if you don’t feel comfortable … it’s time for Ricky to go’.

“I said, ‘We need him. We need him for his batting, but he’ll be another coach for us’. So I fought hard to keep him, I wanted him there. I thought he played a big part in helping that younger generation get to the level we needed to. If he was batting at 80 per cent, he was better than anybody else at No. 3 or No. 4. We think the grass is greener all the time. Very rarely is it.”

Although Ricky Ponting has admitted that his form tailed off in the last phase of his career, he still had the backing of his captain and ended up playing 16 Tests under Michael Clarke between 2011 and late 2012, scoring 1,015 runs at an average of 37.59.

This phase brought his career batting average down from the mid-50s to 51.85. Ricky Ponting was the captain of the Australian cricket team when they won the 2003 and 2007 World Cup.

Ricky Ponting played 375 ODIs for Australia and scored 13704 runs at an average of 42.04. He also has 30 centuries and 82 fifties. Even in the Test format, Ricky Ponting has 13378 runs in 168 matches with 41 hundred. Ricky Ponting is considered one of the most successful captains in international cricket history, with 220 victories in 324 matches with a winning ratio of 67.91%.

Michael Clarke Never Dreamt Of Captaining Australia

In 2013, Ricky Ponting revealed in his autobiography that he didn’t feel as supported by Michael Clarke, the vice-captain. The latter admitted to the same in his autobiography too. In an interview with Brett Finch, Michael Clarke admitted that he found it hard to be Ricky Ponting’s understudy because of the inevitable wait.

“I dreamt of playing for Australia, but I never dreamt of captaining Australia. I found it really difficult when I was vice-captain that there was an expectation that I was always going to be the next captain. I hated that. I would rather have stayed a youngster or be captain. I wasn’t very good at the in-between,” added the 40-year-old.

Michael Clarke. (Photo Source: Getty Images)
Michael Clarke. (Photo Source: Getty Images)(Photo by Pramod Thakur/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)

Michael Clarke debuted for Australia in 2003 and was immediately tipped to be a future Australian captain. He was promoted to the role of vice-captain after Adam Gilchrist’s retirement in 2008. Michael Clarke led Australia between 2011 and 2015. During his tenure, he became the fourth Australian captain after Allan Border, Steve Waugh, and Ricky Ponting (twice) to win the ODI World Cup.

Ashish Nehra, Sachin Tendulkar, Indian national cricket team
Ashish Nehra and Sachin Tendulkar. Image Credit: Getty Images.
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Sachin Tendulkar Called ‘Paaji’ After A Priceless 98 Against Pakistan In 2003 World Cup

Sachin Tendulkar, the world’s leading run-scorer in both Test cricket and One-day Internationals was fondly known as ‘paaji’ (brother) by his teammates. Former Indian fast bowler Ashish Nehra revealed how the word ‘paaji’ was associated with  Tendulkar out of respect until the fag end of his career after his special knock of 98 against Pakistan in the 2003 World Cup.

Before the innings, however, he was fondly called ‘bhai’ which also means brother, but they used the word ‘paaji’ after brilliant innings against Pakistan which included a six over point off Shoaib Akhtar known for his pace.

Sourav Ganguly, who captained India in the 2003 World Cup is known as ‘Dada’. He and Sachin Tendulkar is considered as the most successful opening pair in one-day cricket history.

Sachin Tendulkar, Sourav Ganguly
Sachin Tendulkar and Sourav Ganguly. Image Credit: Getty Images.

India won the match against arch-rivals Pakistan by six wickets to stretch their World Cup wins over Pakistan to 4-0 as Sachin Tendulkar went past 12,000 One-day runs some 17 years ago. Currently, India’s World Cup win records over Pakistan stands at 7-0 as India have never lost against Pakistan in a World Cup match.

Sachin Tendulkar Was Earlier Called Bhai But Later Called Paaji: Ashish Nehra

India chased 274 to win as he played one of the greatest innings of his life. It is also regarded as one of the finest ODI innings ever played.

“Before this, we used to call him Sachin or Sachin ‘bhai’ (brother). The first time we used the word ‘paaji’ was after the 2003 World Cup match against Pakistan,” Nehra said on the Watch Along episode of the India vs Pakistan 2003 match on Star Sports.

Shoaib Akhtar, Sachin Tendulkar

Sachin Tendulkar and Shoaib Akhtar

Tendulkar represented India from 1989 to 2013 and has 15,921 and 18426 runs in 200 Tests and 463 one-dayers respectively. Also, he represented Mumbai Indians in IPL between 2008 and 2013.

Sachin Tendulkar Was Called Paaji No. 1 By Harbhajan Singh

Kapil Dev, who played a match-winning knock of 175 versus Zimbabwe after India were reeling at 17 for five, was called ‘paaji’ after he was instrumental while leading India to an epic maiden World Cup victory in 1983.

“On our way back to the hotel, in the bus, Harbhajan Singh started singing in the back ‘Paaji No. 1’. So that’s how everyone started calling Sachin Tendulkar paaji. Before him, there was only one paaji, who was Kapil paaji.”

Sachin Tendulkar in 2003 World Cup
Sachin Tendulkar in 2003 World Cup

He went after a short and wide ball which was so accurately timed that it flew over to point boundary for six. He followed it with a flick for a boundary and then capped the over with a straight drive down the boundary in the second over of India’s innings.

Even 17 years later, the six over point continued to stand as one of the defining moment of rivalry between India and Pakistan.