Cricket rules, ask anyone who plays cricket and they will tell that they know all of them. Here are 10 Cricket rules which are known to very few people.

10. The ball must weigh not less than five ounces and a half, nor more than five ounces and three-quarters. It must measure not less than nine inches, nor more than nine inches and one quarter in circumference. At the beginning of each innings either party may call for a new ball.

9. The bat must not exceed four and a quarter inches in the widest part; it must not be more than thirty-eight inches in length.

8. The stumps must be three in number; twenty-seven inches out of the ground; the bails eight inches in length, the stumps of sufficient and equal thickness to prevent the ball from passing through.

7. If a lost ball be called, the striker shall be allowed six runs; but if more than six shall have been run before lost ball shall have been called, then the striker shall have all which have been run.

6. The umpires in all matches shall pitch fair wickets, and the parties shall toss up for choice of innings. The umpires shall change wickets after each party has had one innings.

5. At the beginning of each innings the umpire shall call “Play;” from that time to the end of each innings no trial ball shall be allowed to any bowler.

4. If any fieldsman stop the ball with his bat, the ball shall be considered dead, and the opposite party shall add five runs to their score. If any be run they shall have five in all.

3. The wicket-keeper shall not take the ball for the purpose of stumping until it shall have passed the wicket; he shall not move until the ball be out of the bowler’s hand; he shall not by any noise incommode the striker; and if any part of his person be over or before the wicket, although the ball hit, the striker shall not be out.

2. The umpires shall allow two minutes for each striker to come in, and ten minutes between each innings. When the umpire shall call “Play,” the party refusing to play shall lose the match.

1. After the delivery of six balls the umpire must call “Over,” but not until the ball shall be finally settled in the wicket-keeper’s or bowler’s hand; the ball then shall be considered dead: nevertheless, if an idea be entertained that either of the striker’s is out, a question may be put previously to, but not after, the delivery of the next ball.