When India’s Rohit Sharma scored a record-breaking 264 against Sri Lanka in the fourth ODI at Kolkata, the entire World stood on its feet and applauded the Indian’s Herculean efforts. But some section of the fans are yet to recover from the shock of scoring 264 in an ODI. The same can be said Brian Lara’s knock of 400* against England at Antigua and 501* for Warwickshire against Durham, the highest individual scores in Test Cricket and List-A cricket respectively. Many people consider this as the highest individual score by a batsman in the history.

But the history books of the sports says the highest individual score registered by a batsmen in all forms of cricket is 628* and the man who owns the bragging rights for this is Arthur Edward Jeune James Collins. The Indian born batsman, who played school cricket in England, scored a mammoth 628 for Clark’s House against North Town in a junior school house cricket match in 1899.

He was a 13-year old boy then and took 4 long sessions to achieve the feat. 

Those days, the matches were timeless, played to a finish however long they took. The match was played Collins Piece (renamed after his knock) at Bristol. The ground had both a poor surface and a very unusual shape: it was very short (55 m and 60 m long in both the sides) with the other side was a gentle slope falling away towards the school sanatorium in the distance.

The pitch occupied the central 22 yards (20 m) of the narrow field, with the boundary only 16 meters behind each set of stumps. Hits to the long boundary, down the slope, had to be all-run, but the three short boundaries only counted for two runs. Inspite of this record, Collins never represented England in International Cricket or any other first-class teams.