Former New Zealand all-rounder Chris Cairns revealed why his former team mate Brendon McCullum witnessed against him.

Cairns was alleged for involving match-fixing in ICL (Indian Cricket League) during 2008. He was found not guilty and free from the all charges at this Monday.

At first, former IPL (Indian Premier League) chairman Lalit Modi had tweeted in 2010 that Cairns had been involved in the match-fixing during 2008. However, Modi had failed to prove it and paid the cost and damages to the Cairns.  

But the charges again went with strongly after his former team-mates Brendon McCullum and Lou Vincent made comments against him. McCullum had told to ACSU (Anti Corruption and Security Units) of ICC (International Cricket Council) that Cairns made a match-fixing approach to him, which McCullum did not accept. Also, Lou Vincent made a statement that Cairns approached to him for match-fixing.

Cairns spoke out finally about McCullum witness. He told, “McCullum and Vincent are his key witnesses in his civil case in London.” 

 

He added, “Vincent has currently incurred 13 life bans from cricket (one would probably suffice) for his corrupt deeds and, as the jury in my trial was told, he has kept all the cash from his criminal deceit. 

“The current NZ cricket captain now has to decide if he will support Modi in his upcoming action.

“But there is still a real head-scratcher regarding McCullum. Why didn`t he come forward to Modi before my 2012 libel trial?

“McCullum had given a statement to the ICC (International Cricket Council) in February 2011 with Dan Vettori present and both men could have helped Modi out then. So, why now?”

Recently a report told that Lalit Modi will lodge a 1.5 million pound claim in the High Court against Cairns at 2016. Also, many cricket experts are not happy and they are feeling it would be a big blow for the world cricket in fight against corruption.

Cairns described about his current situation.“Beat up, yes. Exhausted, yes. Penniless, yes. Will I continue to fight, absolutely,” he wrote in a column for Fairfax New Zealand.