People love them for their sojourn in cricket. In a short span of time, they took the cricket world by surprise with their whacking performance, and with sudden upsurge they lost their midas touch. Overwhelmed people use to ask me about certain players whose performance made them adore memorabilia.  

There are players who had short stint with international cricket, but, people adore them for their tremendous contribution to cricket

Here at Sportzwiki, we are making a list of players whose career are short lived in cricket, but has very impactful careers.

Shane Bond, retired   

The 90’s generation, I am sure, can’t forget one genuine fast bowler rattled Australia in his debut match, picking up three wickets. The legendry Shane Bond, who started his career with a bang in 2002, finished off his career in 2010 from all form of cricket. New Zealand enjoyed his service for eight years. In his 82 match career, he took 147 wickets.

Shane Bond has outstanding record against Australia; he took 44 wickets in 17 matches with best figure 6 for 23. In his debut match at Melbourne, he took three wickets in low scoring match. Victims of his lethal fast bowling were Steve Waugh, Ricky Ponting and Michael Bevan. He played  2003 and 2007 World Cup and took 30 wickets in 16 matches.  

But, he frustratingly fragile, injuries forced him to struggle throughout the career. He also has short but impressive Test record.  In 18 Test, he picked 87 wickets.

18 Tests

Player

Country

Role

Wickets

Runs

 BBI

BBM

4w

5w

Shane Bond

New Zealand

Fast bowler

87

1922

6/51

10/99

7

5

 

82 ODIs

Player

Country

role

Wickets

Total Runs

BBI

  Average

4w

5w

Shane Bond

New Zealand  

Fast bowler  

147

3070

6/19

20.88

7

4

 

 

 

Late Philip Hughes  

A young soul of 25 left us after being struck on the back of the head. What he left behind is a promising career in disarray. In 26 Test, he scored 1535 runs with career best 160, and in 25 ODIs he scored 826 runs with career best 138 not out. At 19, Hughes underlined why he was one of the most exciting young talents around when he became the youngest to score a century in a Pura Cup/Sheffield Shield final. Just months before Hughes’ death Australia captain Michael Clarke had tipped him to be a 100-Test man.

The promising left-handed opener left us on November 27, 2014 at the age of 25.

26 Tests

Player

Country

role

Total Run

Average

Strike rate  

100s

50s

Highest

Late Philip Huge

Australia

Left-hand batsman  

1535

32.65

53.55

3

7

160

 

25 ODIs

Player

Country

role

Runs

Average

Strike rate

100s

50s

Highest

Wickets

Late Philip

Huge  

Australia

 Left-hand batsman  

826

35.91

75.70

2

4

138*

0

 

Michael Slater, retired

A combative and wholehearted cricketer, Michael Slater has played many vital innings for New South Wales and as an Australia Test opener with his adventurous brand of stroke play.

74 Tests

Player

Country

Role

Total run

Average

Strike rate

100s

50s

Highest

Michael Slater

Australia

Right-hand batsman

5312

42.83

35.29

14

21

219

 

42 ODIs

 

Player

Country

Role

Total run

Average

Strike rate

100s

50s

Highest

Michael Slater

Australia

Right-hand batsman

987

24.07

60.40

0

9

73

 

 

 Stuart MacGill, retired

An old-fashioned operator with a gargantuan legbreak and majestic wrong’un, Stuart MacGill had the best strike-rate and worst luck of any modern spin bowler. His misfortune was to play alongside Shane Warne in an age when Australia, the land of Grimmett and O’Reilly, paradoxically frowned on the concept of fielding two wrist-spinners at once. After showing they could work in tandem with 13 wickets against Pakistan at Sydney in 2005, MacGill hoped – almost pleaded – for more double-act opportunities.

 44 Tests

Player

Country

Role

Wickets

Runs

 BBI

BBM

4w

5w

Sturat MacGil

Australia

Spinner

208

6038

8/108

12/107

9

12

 

Ashwell Prince, retired

A crouching lefthander with a high-batted stance and a grimace reminiscent of Graham Gooch, Ashwell Prince was helped into the national team by South Africa’s controversial quota system, although he quickly justified his selection by top-scoring on debut with a gutsy 49 against the mighty Australians in 2001-02. That innings, and a match winning 48 in the third Test at Durban, seemed to shed his reputation as a one-day flasher. But, he lost his form in 2002-03, he failed in four consecutive home Tests against Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.

He made comeback in the South Africa team following a good domestic performance, and made remarkable contribution with the willow. He last played Test against  Sri Lanka at Durban in 2011 and ODI aganist Australia in the second semifinal of 2007 World Cup. 

66 Tests 

Player

Country

role

Total Run

Average

Strike rate  

100s

50s

Best

Ashwell Prince

South Africa

Left-hand batsman  

3665

41.64

43.70

11

11

160*

 

52 ODIs

Player

Country

role

Runs

Average

Strike rate

100s

50s

Highest

Wickets

Ashwell Prince 

South Africa 

Lefthanded batsman 

1018

35.10

67.77

0

3

89*

0

 

Simon Jones, retired

A strapping and skiddy fast bowler, Simon Jones fought back from a grievous career-threatening knee injury to become an integral member of England’s triumphant Ashes-winning team in 2005. Jones’s pace and mastery of reverse-swing carried him to 18 wickets at 21 in four Tests, before he was forced to sit out a nervy final match due to an ankle problem.

 18 Tests

Player

Country

role

Wickets

Total Runs

BBI

BBM  

4w

5w

Simon Jones

England

Right ram fast medium  

44

205

6/53

7/110

2

3

 

Sturat Clark, retired

Stuart Clark is a tall and lanky opening bowler who was initially bracketed by the national selectors as “in the Glenn McGrath mould”, but he created his own category with strong displays over 24 Tests. He fitted in perfectly in his opening appearances – he replaced McGrath, who was caring for his sick wife – and at the age of 30 experienced a dream start as the Player of the Series with 20 wickets at 15.75 against South Africa. A gamble for the first game at Cape Town, he collected his baggy green and earned his side a victory with 5 for 55 and 4 for 34, the third-best match figures by an Australian debutant behind Bob Massie and Clarrie Grimmett.

24 Tests

Player

Country

role

Wickets

Total Runs

BBI

BBM  

4w

5w

Sturat Clark  

Australia

Right ram fast

94

248

5/32

9/89

6

2

 

39 ODIs

Player

Country

role

Wickets

Total Runs

BBI

  Average

4w

Economy

Sturat Clark  

Australia

Right ram fast medium  

53

1477

4/54

27.86

2

4.84

 

 

David Hussey,  all-rounder

As the younger brother of Michael, David Hussey has copied his sibling’s talent for ridiculous scoring in the English county competition. Also like Michael, Hussey has been forced to pile up mountains of runs in Australia before gaining the confidence of the national selectors. It took his first 1000-run season in 2007-08 before he was finally chosen for a tour, the ODI series in the West Indies in 2008, and earned his first Cricket Australia contract. Earlier in that summer he made his Twenty20 international debut against India at the MCG

69 ODIs

Player

Country

role

Runs

Average

Strike rate

100s

50s

Highest

Wickets

David Hussey

Australia

All-rounder

1796

32.65

90.70

1

14

111

18

 

39 T20s

Player

Country

role

Runs

Average

Strike rate

100s

50s

Highest

Wickets

David Hussey

Australia

All-rounder

756

22.90

121.34

1

14

88*

19

 

Rayan Harris, retired

A hulking fast bowler who charges in and tramples the hopes of opposition batsmen, Harris delivers wickets in bulk. The only problem for Australia is a long and varied list of injuries that have kept Harris from playing anywhere near the amount of Test cricket they would have liked. He was also a late entrant to international cricket, debuting at the age of 29.

27 Tests

Player

Country

Role

Wickets

Runs

 BBI

BBM

4w

5w

Rayn Harris

Australia

Right arm fast

113

2658

7/117

9/106

4

5

 

21 ODIs

Player

Country

Role

Wickets

Runs

BBI

Average

Economy rate

5w

Rayn Harris

Australia

Right arm fast

44

832

5/19

18.90

4.84

3

 

Chris Rogers, Age 37, still playing 

Life membership of the one-Test club seemed a certainty for Chris Rogers, especially when he came close to losing his Cricket Victoria contract in 2012 with the state keen to look to the future. Yet, by early 2014, he had not only added another dozen caps to the single Baggy Green awarded six years earlier but also played a full part in two Ashes series, including the 2013-14 whitewashing of England. Not bad for a 36-year-old and confirmation that, in cricket at least, “never say never” is a phrase worth remembering.

20 Tests

Player

Country

Role

Runs

Average

Highest

100s

50s

Chris Rogers

Australia

Left-handed opener  

1535

39.35

119

4

11

 

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    Sports Crazy man, Live in cricket, Love writing, Studied English journalism in Indian Institute of Mass Communication, Chose sports as the subject for study, Born 24 years ago during the 1992 Cricket world cup. When he is not writing love to watch movies and reading books and novels.

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