The tale of Titanic and a medal winning athlete in the Olympic
Current Sports News

The tale of Titanic and a medal winning athlete in the Olympic

Rio Olympic is set to start from today with a glittering opening ceremony  in Rio de Janerio on August 5.  The world will go gaga as athletes from 207 countries will participate in 42 sports. The Olympics is a place where economic superpowers like China, United States, and Russia like to show their supremacy in sports.

But there are some heartening stories behind the Olympic participation and winning a medal. In 1912, the year which is remembered for the wreckage of Titanic,  the Titanic left the Edgbaston port. On this ship  American ‘Dick’ Williams, then aged 21, was travelling abroad on Titanic, with his father Duane Williams. But the ship, unfortunately, struck the iceberg,- the world knows what happened next- the greatest middle of the sea mishap in the history.

Shortly after the collision on the night, Dick Williams had done great work as he freed a trapped man from a cabin by breaking a door. But, Williams remained on the titanic almost until it immersed under the water when the end met he was washed overboard by a wave that also took several others. He was in the frigid water for six hours before the Carpathia streamer rescued him along with other survivors.

He made his way to Collapsible, A Lifeboat and held on to its side for a while. The survivors in Collapsible A were then transferred to Lifeboat 14, but even after entering Lifeboat 14 Williams spent several hours waist deep in freezing water, which left his legs frostbitten as a result his leg was severely injured that the doctor of the ship-Carpathia, which was  sent to rescue the survivors , recommended his amputation. But, Willaims didn’t want his Tennis career to ruin so he refused the recommendation.

After recovering from the injury he won the US Open in 1914 and 1916 and reached the Wimbledon semifinal in 1924 and then won the mixed doubles gold at the Paris Olympic in 1924.

Dick died in 1968, but before leaving for heaven, the Titanic survivor has won  six Davis Cup.

“As I tried to stand,” he wrote to his family, “it was like thousands of needles going through my legs”–and began to lurch and trudge to restore circulation in his legs. “I tramped the decks constantly, even through the nights, getting up every two hours to walk some more.”

We all know the story of Titanic, which was built before the first World War and destroyed two years before the World War, but the story of William who has done an extraordinary thing after getting a second life is commendable!!!

Most Popular

Top