MCC World Cricket Committee Met Virtually To Discuss Laws Criticised
/

MCC World Cricket Committee Met Virtually To Discuss Laws Criticised

MCC Cricket Committee
MCC Cricket Committee

MCC World Cricket Committee, which includes the likes of Sourav Ganguly, Shane Warne, and Kumar Sangakkara and headed by Mike Gatting, met virtually on Monday to discuss key aspects of the game, including laws that have attracted widespread criticism in the recent past.

The Marylebone Cricket Club, who is the custodian of laws of the game, said that the MCC Cricket Committee met virtually to discuss and review a few laws of the sport, including short-pitched bowling, Decision Review System, saliva ban apart from the future of World Test Championship.

Tim May, Sourav Ganguly, Vince van der Bijl, Shakib Al Hasan (standing), Shane Warne, Mike Gatting and Kumar Sangakkara (sitting) at the MCC World Committee meeting MCC
Tim May, Sourav Ganguly, Vince van der Bijl, Shakib Al Hasan (standing), Shane Warne, Mike Gatting, and Kumar Sangakkara (sitting) at the MCC World Committee meeting in March 2019 MCC

MCC Cricket Committee Will Take Views From Across The Globe Regarding Law-Related To Short Pitch Bowling

The MCC Cricket Committee will embark on a global consultation drive and finalize whether the laws already in place need wholesome changes for cricket’s cause. The MCC Cricket Committee will take views from groups throughout the world on whether the Law relating to short-pitched deliveries is fit for the modern game.

There are important aspects to consider, namely the balance between bat and ball; whether or not concussion should be recognized as a different injury to any other sustained and changes which are specific to particular sectors of the game besides whether or not lower-order batsmen should be given further protection than the Laws currently allow.

Phillip Hughes falls to the ground after being struck in the head by a delivery during day one of the Sheffield Shield at the Sydney Cricket Ground.
Phillip Hughes falls to the ground after being struck in the head by a delivery during day one of the Sheffield Shield at the Sydney Cricket Ground. Mark Metcalfe

MCC Cricket Committee also said that the members unanimously agreed that short-pitched bowling is an integral part of the game at the elite level. Surveys will be distributed in March 2021 onwards to “specific groups” who will be identified and their feedback will hence be taken into account before finalizing whether or not to change laws around short-pitched bowling. The decision will be made public by early 2022.

On November 27, 2014, emerging Australian batsman Phillip Hughes passed away aged only 25. He was felled by a bouncer during an Australian domestic game two days earlier.

He lost consciousness immediately and was placed in an induced coma despite wearing a helmet as the ball struck an unprotected area just below his left ear. In July 2019, ICC agreed to allow the use of concussion replacements in all international cricket matches from 1 August 2019, with the substitute having to be a “like-for-like replacement” and approved by the Match Referee

MCC Cricket Committee Proposed Extension On Saliva Ban And Discussed Decision Review System And World Test Championship

The MCC Cricket Committee also proposed the extension on the ban on using saliva to shine the cricket ball as it said the ICC Cricket Committee recommendation will be in place in the aftermath of the Covid-19 pandemic.

“Since the regulations were introduced, the committee has been closely monitoring the application of only sweat on the ball in relation to the balance of the game. There were some fears raised initially that prohibiting the use of saliva may make conditions too friendly to batsmen,” the statement read.

MCC Cricket committee debated prohibiting the use of saliva on the ball on a permanent basis and some members felt that eliminating the use of saliva on a permanent basis is premature and that it may be possible to allow its use once again in a post-Covid world.

Umpire’s call in the Decision Review System has been a hot topic of debate in the recent past with the likes of Sachin Tendulkar raising concerns about the efficiency of the system used.

The committee debated the use of ‘Umpire’s Call’ for LBW decisions made through the Decision Review System, which some members felt was confusing to the persons watching TV, particularly when the batsman involved could either be Out or Not out depending on the on-field umpire’s original decision. They felt it would be simpler if the original decision was disregarded on review.

Sachin Tendulkar on DRS (Image Source: Twitter)
Sachin Tendulkar on DRS (Image Source: Twitter)

According to the ICC rules, the on-field decision stays after DRS review if there is no conclusive evidence to overturn it. In the case of LBW appeals, the on-field decision by the umpire stays if more than half of the ball misses the stumps even after clipping the stumps.

The ‘hitting zone’ of the stumps would still be retained, which had to be hit by at least 50% of the ball for the umpire to give Out as the decision. Other members were satisfied with the current system, feeling that it was important to retain the human element of the on-field umpire’s decision, which takes into account the benefit of the doubt.

The inaugural cycle of the World Test Championship (2019 to 2021) is in its final stages and one head towards the next cycle which will be played from 2021 to 2023, as the MCC committee discussed the changes needed to enhance the status of the WTC.

Some of the other suggestions discussed by the MCC Cricket Committee include a more simplified points system, a clear window in the Future Tours Programme, and the marketing of the tournament to make it easier for supporters to understand besides inducting specialist TV umpires and the disproportionate amount of women’s cricket played in the aftermath of Covid-19 when compared to men’s cricket.